Optimal Recovery from Caesarean Birth

After a Caesarean birth, you will be given a list of recovery tips from your medical care provider.  The following additional information contributes to optimal recovery following a surgical birth.

Taking care of a baby is a full-time job and deserves recognition as such.  Recovery from major abdominal surgery is also a full-time job.  For most people, in 6-8 weeks life will gain a new normal but it takes longer than that to fully recover from a Caesarean birth.

FOR BIRTH MOM:

REST, REST, REST!

This is essential for recovery. Although you have a newborn (perhaps other children too) at home, do the best you can to rest and recover. Get the support needed to do this, such as from a Postpartum Doula.

  • Sleep while the baby sleeps. Really, really!!! Let the house go for now! Enlist help if other responsibilities prevent you from napping.
  • No lifting or hard exercise. Listen to your body. Any pain means stop and rest right away. This will be humbling.
  • Hire a cleaner if you don’t have good live-in support. A weekly or bi-weekly cleaning works magic for your sanity.
  • Have an open house / meet-baby gathering to entertain all friends at once rather than spend hours daily with visitors.
  • Learn to accept help. Just say thank-you! Ask for help from friends & family. They’d love to make food, babysit siblings, walk the dog, feed the pets, do laundry etc. Your turn to help another will come later.
  • Make a “guest rule”. Any visitors must bring or prepare food (and clean up their mess), and/or do a chore from a list you’ve made. Make it clear they will not be entertained! They are there to help. This gets you help and decreases visitors.

For internal healing:

Osteopathy, Visceral Manipulation Therapy, and CranioSacral Therapy help resolve trauma and restore fluidity to organs & tissues, which speeds healing, decreases pain and facilitates long-term recovery. When internal tissues are exposed to air, adhesions can form. During surgery, organs are shifted from their optimal placement. Wait 4-6 weeks before starting treatment.

If you’re into Homeopathy: Traumeel (drops or tabs) during the entire post-surgical recovery phase, or homeopathic Arnica 200CH first 3-5 days (3 granules once daily).

Emotional Recovery:

Emotions following a Caesarean birth vary from woman to woman. One may feel completely satisfied with her birth and emotional recovery is not an issue. Conversely, another may feel loss, regret, blame or disappointment. There are infinite factors that lead to Caesarean birth.

Many people will say, “At least your baby is healthy”, but a woman’s birth journey is important too. Give yourself permission to feel sadness about your birth; it doesn’t mean you’d trade your baby’s health for your “ideal birth” nor that you don’t love and appreciate your baby. There’s room for being totally in love, feeling anger or sadness or happiness – all of it!

Other well-meaning folks might say at least you didn’t have to “suffer” in labour or that you got to take the “easy way out”. Forgive their ignorance. Many people don’t realize how difficult a Caesarean birth and recovery can be, often much more so than a natural birth.

  • Rescue Remedy as needed for grief, shock, disappointment.
  • Be kind and forgiving to yourself and allow space for grieving if you need it.
  • Several local health professionals can help with emotional trauma. Some use Flower Remedies, homeopathy, Reiki, other energy work, and/or verbal counselling styles.

For the scar:

  • After the stitches have dissolved, healthy high-quality oil such as rosehip seed oil (Rosa masquetta) on the incision site as often as possible to nourish the skin and decrease scarring. Combine with an essential oil blend to decrease itching, scarring, incidence of thick scarring and to speed healing (eg Blaine Andrusek Scar-B-Gone). If you don’t have these, vitamin-E oil will do.
  • From 6 weeks on, Castor Oil packs over the incision to help with healing. Soak a cotton cloth in castor oil. Put cloth against skin, cover with plastic bag or saran wrap (to protect bedding or clothing), then apply hot water bottle. Leave on for an hour daily or until you intuitively feel you’ve had enough. If the cloth is still clean it can be folded away in the plastic and reused. Once the cloth appears to have absorbed toxins use another one. This treatment can be done for as long as you wish – weeks or months.

To Counter the Antibiotics:

While antibiotics can prevent or treat infection, they also lead to an imbalance in normal flora by killing the good bacteria in our gut. Balance can be restored by ingesting unpasteurized, fermented foods (e.g. kombucha tea, kimchi, sauerkraut) or probiotics such as acidophilus powder or caps – high quality only.  That’s the ones found in the fridge at health stores or your holistic care providers office.

  • 3 caps or ¼ tsp, twice daily for 3-4 weeks. This decreases Candida albicans overgrowth, which in turn protects the digestive system from pathogens and boosts immunity. It protects you from diarrhea, vaginal yeast infections, and painful nipples commonly associated with antibiotics, and will protect the baby from thrush (mouth sores/diaper rash).
  • If you or baby show signs of such side effects, add a third dose until 2 weeks after symptoms disappear, then go back to the regular dose. Make a little paste to apply to nipples or pinkie-finger at feeding time to dose your baby.

Nutrition:

  • Eat whole, healthy foods and lots of them.
  • Continue your high-quality prenatal vitamin for the duration of breastfeeding or 8 weeks, whichever is later.
  • High quality, easily assimilated iron supplement such as Flora Dix or placenta capsules. You’ll take less of this type of iron, absorb more overall, and avoid constipation associated with most iron supplements. Helps after blood-loss associated with surgery. (Women lose an average of up to 1L of blood after a Caesarean birth, compared with 300-500 ml with vaginal birth.)
  • Eat well and drink lots of water. Continue drinking your raspberry leaf and nettle tea, optimally 3 cups daily, for at least a month. See herb tea recipe, “Essential Herbs for Pregnancy & Nursing”
  • Ingest healthy absorbable protein; your body’s doing a lot of rebuilding now.

FOR BABY:

Caesarean birth is also traumatic for the baby. Osteopathy, cranio-sacral therapy and newborn chiropractic care by someone who specializes in newborn-care is essential.

To Counter Antibiotics Side-Effects: Acidophilus powder (see above). Continue for 3-4 weeks. This will decrease Candida overgrowth, which in turn protects the digestive system, boosts immunity, protect thrush (mouth sores), diarrhea, and diaper rash commonly associated with antibiotics. Make a paste from 1/8 tsp and rub on nipples just before nursing, twice daily. Or dip a wet pinkie-finger into the powder and let baby suck it off.

If you’re into homeopathy, there are remedies that are safe and effective for baby too, in case you notice thrush, trauma, or other long term effects.

I teach a variety of Child Birth Education classes and prenatal workshops online for people all over.  I have been a birth doula since 2002, and have helped over 300 clients with their births and over 1000 through prenatal classes. Learn more about my birth doula services, and contact me with any questions you may have.

Five more steps to the birth of your dreams

Many pregnant people look forward to their upcoming labour and birth with both excitement and apprehension. We’re here to tell you that it doesn’t have to be scary. As we shared in a recent blog post, once you have a plan, a vision of the outcome you want and begin taking steps to get there, all the unknown and loss of control starts to fade away.

To help you continue preparing for a birth experience that is satisfying and empowering, here are five more steps to the birth of your dreams!

6) Care for yourself and your baby

Take care of your general health as best as you can; this is proven to support better birth outcomes and it is another thing you can control. Healthy foods in as close to their natural state as possible, proper hydration (find a fun water bottle to carry around and refill), pregnancy teas, all help to build a healthy baby. (Note: obviously if you are dealing with extreme nausea that does not allow you control over what you eat and whether or not it stays down, skip to Step 7.)

Gentle physical exercise, particularly yoga, helps prepare women for birth and a faster recovery. FInd an online class that you like. Go for walks.

Ensure your non-physical self is healthy too. What nourishes your spirit and soul? Time alone? Time with others? Time to create? Time to nest?

I wish you ease and grace in caring for yourself during your pregnancy.

7) Choose the primary care-provider for your pregnancy and birth

Doctor

Depending on where you live you might have lots of choices or limited choices in this area.

In Regina we have some midwives, but not enough. Some family doctors that also catch babies. One birth centre in a near-by community. Lots of over-worked Ob/Gyns (IMO) too.

Do the best you can to chose someone whose values align with yours. Midwives are often the first choice for women who plan natural births, and they attend both home and hospital births. If there are in short supply, then call the office early to get on the wait list.

Family doctors who attend births are a great option for a healthy woman who doesn’t need the high-risk expertise of an obstetrician. Most family doctors in our area care for women for most of their pregnancy and then transfer care to another family doc or an obstetrician.

Obstetricians are highly skilled for women with known health issues or who are at increased risk of complications but they catch most of the babies in our area and are the most common option here.

8) Be aware of your stress triggers

What irritates or stresses you now can be a big clue to what might create or adds stress during your birth?

That varies with everyone and you are the only one who gets to decide on this. For some women it is noise, or smells, or chatter, or lack of information; for others it’s lack of modesty or privacy. Someone who is in the room who irritates you; someone you wish was there with you and isn’t.

Figure out what causes you stress and do everything you can to plan ahead so you can eliminate that possibility or at least minimize its effect.

9) Maximize comfort in your pregnancy and plan to be comfortable in labour

Baby

What brings you comfort? Think of your five senses. We are sensual beings!

Do you prefer to see dim or bright lights, hear silence, medical sounds, or music of your choice? How would you like to be touched, if at all?

Practice getting effective massage and counter-pressure. Reduce internal exams during labour is possible. Wear clothes that you chose for comfort and the level of modesty that suits you.

What do you wish to smell (hint – birth companions: pack a toothbrush)? Research helpful and appropriate aromatherapy oils to use at home. Take your own pillow so you can that comfortable smell and feel.

What kind of drink would you like to taste during your birth? What foods can you enjoy during labour or afterwards? What feast can you plan to celebrate the birth!

Comfort is only possible if we first feel safe and supported so review those essentials and get things in place so you can feel secure.

10) Bring joy, fun and calm into your birth

What makes you laugh?
What calms you down?
What do you enjoy?

Remember you can laugh, be loud, be silent; you can dance, move about, wear clothing in which you feel comfortable or beautiful, get snuggly with your partner, be in the dark, enjoy sunlight, create a big personal-space bubble in the bathtub or birth pool, watch a funny movie in early labour, walk in the fresh air, have a nap.

In my thirty years as a doula I have encouraged clients first to nap and stay well fed and hydrated, and then to do something nurturing or even mischievous – make out, go for a walk to get a tea or take-out treat, take some last-day-of-pregnancy photos, meet up with friends and have contractions while you visit. Make some banana bread for later – maybe it will still be warm when you are holding your baby. (True story.)

Respect your introvert or extrovert needs and explore the possibilities!

Know of other steps you would recommend to someone preparing for an upcoming birth? Want to know more about my online prenatal classes or in need of birth support? Please contact me!

 

Article written by my wise friend and work-partner, Karen Herriot – Master Doula, Doula Trainer, Yoga Teacher.

 

Five steps to the birth of your dreams

Most women anticipate labour and birth with a mix of excitement, and fear—of all the unknown and loss of control. In the face of that kind of vulnerability, it is good to have a plan, a vision of the outcome you want and then begin taking steps to get there.

Actively preparing with easy, practical measures will lead to a birth experience that is satisfying and empowering. No client of ours ever told us “I did too much to prepare for my birth.” That is why we are happy to suggest these five steps to the birth of your dreams!

1) Choose online prenatal education or yoga classes that reflect your vision of an ideal birth.

A virtual gathering with other pregnant women in online classes that discuss pregnancy, labour and birth will help you to find support and community in which to make your choices, share ideas, and learn together.

I also lead virtual Regina Hospital tours, allowing you to become accustomed to the setting in which your birth will unfold. Attending these classes is your start to finding your tribe and building vital connections that will help you thrive in the postpartum.

2) Create your circle of support and birth-power

Expecting Couple

Take a clear-eyed look at the others on your support team. Partners sometimes feel pressured to perform and provide a level of physical and psychological support that may exceed their capacities. Many times it feels unfair to expect them to take on such a new role all on their own.

What do they need to feel supported? What things can you both do in the prenatal time? Have they talked to other non-birthing partners? Birth is a shared experience so both of you need to be mindful of what you need and communicate your expectations.

If a friend or relative is invited, are they experienced, will they add calm or stress to your birth, will they come at any time and stay as long as needed? Have you invited them or did they invite themselves? You get to decide. Birth is not a spectator sport – as the birthing woman you get to choose.

If you’re a solo parent-to-be, consider inviting someone who brings you comfort. Any person coming to the birth should attend prenatal education classes with the mother. They should be familiar with the birth setting, the protocols there, their own availability and the ability to be a helpful presence, not a distraction.

3) Hire a Doula

It is hard to navigate all the decisions you will be faced in pregnancy, labour and birth. Why do it alone?

Professional doulas support the birthing woman and her labour team members. Women who have doula support have half the rates of cesarean births as those without. They also have significantly shorter labours, request pain meds at far lower rates (less than half as often), and experience significantly fewer interventions.

Doulas are experts in comfort measures and also great information resources. Whether it is a simple question or a complex decision, your doula is there to help you through every choice you make. Partners do more when there is a doula on their team!

Plus – doulas make the process fun! We are trained to smooth out the edges, show you the ropes and be your birth sherpas! Contact me for more information!

4) Make an effective birth plan that works for you instead of against you

There are many options for labour and birth, but many people don’t know they can do some research, ask some questions and design their birth their way. It is important to know what to expect from your time in the hospital (or home if that is your choice); it is important to be informed and prepared.

There are many things you can control in the face of the vulnerability of labour and birth.

We all want to feel safe first. For our babies to be born in a cocoon of safety. And then we are allowed to want other things as well.

You are allowed and encouraged to dream big and envision the birth of your dreams, not just a birth that is safe, not just the birth you dread.

  • What makes you feel safe?
  • What stresses you out?
  • What do you need?
  • What would you love to happen?
  • Quiet respectful space to labour in?
  • A less clinical feel to the room?
  • A more clinical and monitored space? So you know both you and baby are ok.
  • Want to catch your baby?
  • Keep the cord?
  • Use your own playlist to create the vibe?
  • Wear your own clothes?
  • Use your own pillow?
  • Labour in whatever position is most comfortable to you?
  • Birth in the posture of your choice?

Your plan should use positive language, including things that are unique and important to you. Including the things that are essential for you.

5) Find and Practise tools to manage the intensity of labour

Pregnant Yoga

Whether your labour is a sprint, a marathon or a surgical experience – many women describe birth as hard work.

There are things you can do to manage this intensity! Whether you plan to labour naturally or to use an epidural to support your experience, taking the time to strategize what tools might work for you – and practice the skills while you are pregnant is essential.

Be your sensuous self and amplify your senses to distract or soothe yourself – sight, sound, smell, touch!

Mindfulness, yoga, meditation, sound/music, and visualizations/affirmations are valuable tools. Hypnobirthing is a system many women find helpful. As are hynotherapy sessions with a trained therapist. Ask me for suggestions.

Control, control, control! Find things that you can control and control the heck out of them!

Looking for more information on your upcoming birth? Interested in taking one of my online prenatal classes or in need of birth support? Please contact me!

Article written by my wise friend and work-partner, Karen Herriot – Master Doula, Doula Trainer, Yoga Teacher.

Brewer Pregnancy Nutrition

Adequate protein and good quality nutrition are required for the increased metabolic functions that accompany pregnancy. Many midwives and practitioners recommend good nutrition during pregnancy, including the Brewer Diet.  There’s an overwhelming amount of evidence to support them.

A study conducted at Harvard University found that eating at ≥75 grams of protein daily helps prevent diseases of pregnancy such as pre-eclampsia (Abubakar & al., 2011) (Haas, 1995).

In the 1960’s Dr. Tom Brewer worked with a large, high-obstetrical-risk group in California: impoverished ethnic minority teen mothers in their first pregnancy.  During the same time in other areas of the USA, this group had up to 35% rates of serious pregnancy diseases, preeclampsia and eclampsia. Dr. Brewer worked with more than 7000 pregnant women over more than 12 years. He asked each woman about her diet and determined that malnutrition was prevalent.  All of his clients were required to attend nutritional counselling and were fed good nutrition and adequate protein.  The incidence of serious pregnancy illnesses  among his patients dropped to 0.5% (Brewer & Brewer-Krebs, 1977)! This is remarkable and well documented but as there was no “control group” (a group who didn’t receive “treatment”, because Dr. Brewer felt it would be unethical to withhold good nutrition from a group of pregnant women), most medical associations don’t consider this scientifically valid research.

The basic Brewer diet recommends a daily minimum of 2600 calories, 80-120 grams protein, salt-to-taste, green veggies, whole grains, fats, and vitamin-rich foods (Jones).  The Brewer diet can be easily integrated into general good pregnancy nutrition (see Basic Prenatal Nutrition handout (Evans, 2011)).  For example, while the Brewer Diet doesn’t specify types of salt or fat, whole-mineral salts (e.g. Himalayan or Celtic) and high quality omega-3 fats are healthiest.  Special needs such as food-sensitivities / allergies, ethical choices or cultural habits can all be incorporated into the Brewer Diet.  As usual, ensure you eat 3 meals and 3 snacks daily, including protein at each one.

If you wish to check out the actual “Brewer Diet”, see diet checklists at www.blueribbonbaby.org .  They also include vegan and vegetarian options.  Below is a basic checklist you can use.

Brewer Pregnancy Diet Food Log

The list below is the minimum daily requirements according to Dr. Brewer.  You may wish to consult a holistic nutritionist if you have special needs.  Let you midwife know if you aren’t meeting these daily minimums as this requires prompt attention.

Check off a box each time you have a serving.  Each food counts as one checkmark on the lists e.g. a glass of milk counts as either “Milk” or “Protein”, but not both.  Examples for each category are presented.  Modify to fit any special considerations you have, such as vegetarian or a health issue to work around.

DAILY MINIMUMS:

oooooooo  (8) Calcium source; servings below.  Note 125ml = ½ cup

½ cup animal milk, yogurt or sour cream

¼ cup cottage cheese

1 small slice cheese

36 almonds

12 Brazil nuts

1 tbsp raw sesame seeds

1/3 cup cooked bok choy or collard greens

1 cup broccoli, cooked

½  cup kale

2 teaspoons blackstrap molasses

4 oz black olives

1 oz sardines

 

oooooooo  (8) Protein; servings below.  1oz = 7g.

Note:  See information about fish and mercury on Basic Prenatal Nutrition handout.

1 oz poultry, fish, red-meat, or organs

¼ cup canned salmon or tuna

3 sardines

1 oz cheese: cheddar, Swiss, other hard cheese

¼ cup cottage cheese

1/8 cup brewer’s yeast + 1/4 cup rice

1/8 cup sesame or sunflower seeds + ½ cup cup rice

1/8 cup beans + 1/4 cup whole rice or ½ cup cornmeal (measured before cooking)

 

oo (2) Fresh, dark green vegetables; servings below

1 cup broccoli

1 cup brussels sprouts

½ cup lettuce (preferable romaine)

½ cup endive

½ cup asparagus

½ cup sprouts: bean, alfalfa

2/3 cup greens e.g. collard, turnip, beet, mustard, dandelion, kale, spinach

 

ooooo (5) Whole grains; servings below

1 slice whole grain bread

1 corn tortilla

½ cup oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa,

1 shredded wheat biscuit

½ cup bran flakes or granola

¼ cup wheat germ

1 waffle or pancake made from whole grain

½  roll, muffin, or bagel made from whole grain

 

oo (2) Vitamin C foods; servings below

½ grapefruit

½ cup grapefruit juice

1 orange

½ cup orange juice

1 large tomato

1 cup tomato juice

½ cantaloupe

1 lemon or lime

½ cup papaya

½ cup strawberries

1 large green pepper

1 large potato, any style

 

ooo (3) Fats and oils; servings below

1 tbsp butter

¼ avocado

1 tbsp nut-butter

1 tsp algae oil

1 tbsp first/cold-pressed vegan oil – olive, flax, avocado, hemp, coconut

1 tsp cold-pressed fish oil – cod-liver, sardine, mackerel, anchovy, krill

 

o (1) Vitamin A foods; servings below

3 apricots

½ cantaloupe

½ cup carrots (1 large)

½ cup pumpkin

½ cup winter squash

1 sweet potato

 

Salt and other sodium sources—unlimited, to taste

kelp powder–to taste

soy sauce or tamari–to taste

full spectrum natural salt to taste – Himilayan, Celtic

 

Water—unlimited; drink to avoid thirst, not in response to it

Purified water is best – see http://www.angieevans.ca/pdf/Water%20&%20Hydration.pdf

Fresh, home-made juice

Unsweetened herbal tea (see Safe Herbs in Pregnancy handout)

 

 

References

Abubakar, A., & al. (2011, Aug). Lipid Profiles and Platelets Counts of Pre-eclamptic women in Selected Rural Areas of Northern Nigeria.  WebmedCentral PHYSIOLOGY: http://www.webmedcentral.com/article_view/2121

ACOG. (2002, Jan). Diagnosis and Management of Preeclampsia and Eclampsia; #33. ACOG Practise Bulletin – Clinical Management Guidelines for Obstetrician-Gynecologists: http://mail.ny.acog.org/website/SMIPodcast/DiagnosisMgt.pdf

Brewer, D. T., & Brewer-Krebs, G. (1977). What Every Pregnant Woman Should Know. The Dr. Brewer Pregnancy Diet: http://www.drbrewerpregnancydiet.com/id74.html

Evans, A. (2011). Basic Prenatal Nutrition. Canmore.

Frye, A. (2007). Understanding Diagnostic Tests in the Childbearing Year, 7th Ed. Portland, OR: Labrys Press.

good nutrition… for healthier moms and babies. (n.d.).  BlueRibbonBaby.org: http://www.blueribbonbaby.org/

Haas, A. (1995). Preventing Preeclamsia, PIH, Toxemai and HELLP by Good Nutrition. Midwifery Today .

Jones, J. M. (n.d.).  The Dr. Brewer Pregnancy Diet: http://www.drbrewerpregnancydiet.com/

Maine, D. (2000). Role of nutrition in the prevention of toxemia. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition , 72 (1), 298-300.

NICE. (2010, Aug). NICE clinical guideline 107: Hypertension in pregnancy. NHS – National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence: http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/live/13098/50418/50418.pdf

 

 

Placenta Capsules FAQs

What qualifies you to provide this service?
Proper training and a lot of experience:  We’ve offered this service since 2009 and between us have done 500+ placentas, making us the most experienced encapsulators in Saskatchewan.  We are both OSHA certified and trained in Universal Precautions, food science and preservation.  We train placenta encapsulators through Birth Ways International.

How long does it take?  The capsules are ready in 1-2 days from when we get the placenta.

How many capsules will I get?
That depends on the size of your placenta.  Most women get over 100 capsules.  The average is around 115.  Bigger placentas can fill close to 140 capsules.

What’s the difference between gel and veg caps?
Gel caps are made from animal gelatin and veg caps are vegan, made from plant materials.  See a detailed ingredients list for our high quality capsules.

How do you clean and care for your equipment?
The processing is done using OSHA Blood Borne Pathogen Standards. All surfaces and equipment are cleaned, then disinfected, then twice-sterilized using chemical methods. (This is “over-kill” but is reassuring to us and our clients!)  We use high quality equipment that can be properly sterilized and is kept in like-new working order.

Can I keep my placenta if I have a caesarean birth?
Yes.  The steps are exactly the same.  Simply ensure your O.R. nurse knows you wish to keep it.

Am I “allowed” to keep my placenta?  Do I need permission from my doctor?
It’s yours to keep.  Simply write in your birth plan or tell your care-provider, “I’m keeping my placenta.”  Other details are for you to share or not as you choose.  Obstetrical staff at Regina General Hospital and nearby rural hospitals are quite used to women keeping their placenta.  If you’re at another hospital that has concerns, then you can sign their Release of Live Tissue waiver.  Remind the people attending your birth that you wish to keep it.

Can you make capsules from my placenta if I choose to use epidural or other medications in labour?  Yes.

Is my placenta safe to encapsulate if there’s meconium (baby poops inside) during the birth?
Yes.  The initial cleaning process and proper dehydration takes care of this.

Are there any cases where my placenta can’t be encapsulated?
In the rare case of uterine or placental infection during labour, your placenta will be taken away to the pathology department for analysis.  We’ve processed well over 500 placentas and have never received one that was infected (we do watch for it though).  All placentas are inspected after birth by midwives/doctors, who do not send infected placentas (or anything else) home with patients.

If your placenta is left at room temperature for too long then we are unable to process it.

Do you serve out-of-town clients?
Yes.  We have systems in place to make this easy for you.  We provide detailed, easy-to-follow instructions.

How do I package the placenta for you?
At Regina General Hospital, the placenta is usually put into a square plastic container; you can use that for storage and transport.  We provide detailed instructions to bring your own container as a back-up.  You can ask your nurse to get it ready.  While it’s not her “job”, most are happy to help.  At home births or other hospitals you’ll need to provide your own container (we provide detailed instructions).  If you have your baby at night or are shipping the placenta, then you’ll keep it cold (detailed instructions provided) until the morning when it’s picked up.

How do I get the placenta to you?
One of us picks it up at Regina General Hospital or at your home in Regina city limits, depending where you give birth.  If you have your baby out of town then you can have it delivered to us.  We provide detailed instructions.

How do you ensure the capsules are returned to the right person?
This is one of the most important parts of the process!  One of several advantages to working in partnership is that we can process two placentas at the same time in two separate locations. We have a triple labeling system in place to ensure 100% accuracy; your placenta is attached to a label at every stage of processing, from placenta pick-up through to delivery of capsules.  These are a matter of routine, and are followed with every client’s placenta, even though we rarely have 2 placentas in the same building at the same time.

How do I get the capsules back?
We deliver the capsules anywhere within Regina city limits.  If you live out of town then we can ship them or send them with someone going your way (we can drop the package off anywhere in Regina to that person).

How long do the capsules last?
They’re best used within 1 year, stored at room temperature in an airtight container (glass jar).  After that they don’t necessarily go “bad”, but the nutrients start to diminish.  If you wish to keep them longer, then the freezer can extend that for up to another year if they go in within the first few months.  (We don’t recommend this because we hear from so many women who put them in the freezer and promptly forgot about them.)

How do I store the capsules?
Just keep them in the glass jar.  There’s no need to refrigerate them.  They’re good for up to a year at room temperature in a cupboard.  If you wish to keep them longer, then store in a deep-freeze for up to two years.

Can you make capsules out of my frozen placenta?  Yes.

How do we proceed? 
Please follow the steps on our encapsulation page.  There’s a form for you to complete and all the information you need is there too.  We need your estimated due date and contact info.  You can send an e-transfer, post-dated cheque or provide cash with the placenta.

What if I Haven’t Made Arrangements Yet?  We can usually accommodate you.  In an ideal world everything will be set up ahead of time.  However if you just decided to do this while you’re in labour – or even after your birth – and need to make quick arrangements, please text during normal “awake” hours.  (If you have your baby after 9am or before 8am, please put your placenta in fridge or on ice and get in touch in the morning.)  Please follow the steps on our encapsulation page.

Do you buy or sell placentas, or placenta products?
We do not!  This is not only unethical and unsafe, but is illegal in Canada.  (If anyone offers to do this, please report them to the Public Health Department.)  We provide the service of turning your own placenta into capsules for your own use.

Use of Herbs During Pregnancy & Lactation

Herbal medicine is specific category of health-care.  Many herbs, including essential oils, are safe and beneficial during the childbearing year, while others can be dangerous.  Pregnant women must be cautious with any remedies, especially during the first trimester when the fetus is most vulnerable.  There’s a lot of misinformation concerning herbs.  Here are lists of commonly used herbs that are considered safe and unsafe through pregnancy and postpartum.

Avoiding Post-Dates Pregnancy

Post-term or post-date pregnancy is one that exceeds 40-42 weeks gestation, depending where you live.  If a woman is healthy and well nourished then her placenta is likely to thrive and nourish the baby at any gestation.  If there are signs that mother or baby will be healthier with baby Earth-side, then induction is warranted; otherwise it’s a much overused intervention that leads to a Cascade of Intervention.    

Inaccurate Reporting on Encapsulation and GBS

The report alleging an infant being infected with Group-B Strep bacteria from placenta capsules is completely inaccurate. In reading through the details (summarized below), you’ll see that it’s impossible that the placenta capsules were the source of infection. This is not a study, but rather a media article.  One story is never a scientific study.  As is often the case in anything birth-related, the headline is misleading.

Birth Doula FAQs

What’s a doula?
A doula is a woman experienced in childbirth who provides continuous physical, emotional and informational support to the mother and partner during pregnancy, birth & early postpartum. In much of the world today and throughout history, women support women through labour & birth.

What’s the difference between a midwife and a doula?
Doulas work as part of a team with doctors or midwives, but not instead of. They provide non-medical support and comfort measures (e.g. encouragement, massage, positioning suggestions). They do not perform clinical tasks such as heart rate, blood pressure, or internal exams.

Midwives are highly trained in the medical aspects of birth. The carry oxygen, medicines, resuscitation equipment and other gear, and are known as primary care-givers during birth. In North America primary/medical birth care is offered by either a midwife or a physician.

Why choose a doula over simply using a friend or family member as support?
Doulas are trained and experienced in childbirth support. They know the sounds and behaviors of laboring women, and what that may indicate about progress. Doulas are trained in pain-reducing comfort measures, natural methods to keep labor progressing, and to support both the laboring woman and her partner. Doulas are familiar with local hospital policies & practices and have often built a rapport with the doctors, nurses and midwives. See http://evidencebasedbirth.com/2012/06/26/why-wouldnt-you-hire-a-doula/

In most Canadian hospitals, women are allowed 2 support persons – usually that’s her partner and a support person. Some hospitals accommodate a 3rd support person. Homebirths and birth centers encourage women to have all the support they wish.

How does the doula fit in with nursing staff?
Doulas do not replace nurses or other medical staff, but rather work as part of the team. They are there to comfort and support the mother & her partner. Nurses change shifts; doulas stay.

How does a doula assist with communication in hospitals during labor & birth?
During prenatal meetings doulas learn what’s important to a couple and discuss how to make informed decisions. A doula may remind or encourage a client to ask the questions necessary to understand a procedure and make informed decisions. Doulas do not speak on a client’s behalf nor intervene in their clinical care. They do not make decisions for clients, nor judge the decisions clients’ make, but are there to support those decisions.

What difference does the presence of a trained doula have on birth outcomes?
The presence of a doula tends to result in shorter labours with fewer complications and less interventions. When a doula is present during and after childbirth, women report greater satisfaction with their birth experience, make more positive assessments of their babies, have fewer caesareans and requests for medical intervention, and less postpartum depression. In case of unplanned circumstances, doula support helps reduce negative feelings about one’s childbirth experience. Studies [1],[2],[3],[4]   have shown that babies born with doulas present tend to have shorter hospital stays with fewer admissions to special care nurseries, breastfeed more easily and have more affectionate mothers in the postpartum period.

Analysis of six randomized trials1 demonstrates that lack of doula presence correlates with:

  • Double the overall caesarean rate
  • 33% increase in length of labour
  • 67% increase in oxytocin use
  • 2 ½ times more requests for epidurals

Will a doula make my partner feel unnecessary?
A responsible doula compliments and enhances the father/partner in their supportive role rather than acting as a replacement. (While I respect people’s individual circumstances, I will use “father” words for most of this paragraph.) The presence of a doula allows the father to support his partner emotionally during labor & birth without the pressure to remember everything he learned in childbirth class! The father typically has little-to-no actual experience with the birth process, yet is expected to act as a coach. Some partners feel (accurately) that this is a huge expectation. Many fathers experience the birth as an emotional journey of their own and find it hard to be objective. A doula is supportive to both the mother and her partner, and plays a crucial role in helping a partner become involved in the birth to the extent he/she feels comfortable. Studies have shown that fathers usually participate more actively during labor with the presence of a doula than without one.

When a couple works well together during the birth process they’re better able to handle the challenges of early parenthood. An incredible bond forms or is made stronger.

How often and when do we meet?
We’ll meet 2-3 times before the birth. The introductory meeting is any-time – it’s never too early. The prenatal meetings are best done between 24-36 weeks. After your baby is born there will be a minimum of one postpartum visit, more if needed or desired.

Are doulas only useful if planning an un-medicated birth?
The role of the doula is to help attain a safe and pleasant birth, not to choose the type of birth. The presence of a doula is beneficial no matter what type of birth you are planning. In fact, women who choose a medicated birth need as much support as those who choose a natural birth, but a different kind of support. For women who know they want a medicated birth, the doula still provides emotional support, informational support and comfort measures to help the women through labor and the administration of medications. Doulas can help a mom deal with possible side affects and by filling in the gap that medication may not cover; rarely does medication take all discomfort away.

For a mother who faces a cesarean, a doula provides comfort, support and encouragement. Often a cesarean is an unexpected situation and moms are left feeling unprepared, disappointed and lonely. In this case doula support is especially helpful during the early postpartum period.

What if I planned a drug-free birth then change my mind during labour?
Doulas don’t make decisions for clients or intervene in clinical care, nor do they judge women’s choices. They provide informational & emotional support while respecting a woman’s decisions.

What kind of comfort measures do you use during the labour & birth process?
While there are common comfort measures taught in doula training courses, each doula also brings her own tools and methods. Ours include the following:

  • Positioning suggestions
  • Massage & various touch methods
  • Homeopathy & Bach Flowers (optional; no extra charge)
  • Aromatherapy
  • Encouragement & reassurance
  • Heat or cold as desired
  • Hydrotherapy (water for comfort in labour, and/or water-birth)
  • Create space for partner, and recommendations to help partner to offer support
  • A calm, reassuring presence who trusts the birth process

When do we call you in labour?
Please call at the first signs of suspected labour. We’ll discuss what those are. From then on you’ll keep us posted on your progress and what’s happening.

When and where do you join us in labour?
When depends on the woman, her partner, and the labour. Early support often takes the form of checking in by phone and/or dropping by your place.  Your doula joins you either at your home or in hospital or birth center and remains with you until 1-2 hours after the birth.

How does shared-care work?
Doulas team up to provide enhanced service. Clients benefit from combined experience, education, and availability. Since doulas are on call for up to a month for each client, shared care allows them time for important life events and days off without having to turn clients away or rely on unfamiliar back-up. Clients meet both doulas prenatally so they’re familiar with whichever one attends birth.

What if you can’t be at the birth?
In the rare circumstance that one of your doulas can’t be there, you will be well supported. We work with reliable back-ups who offer excellent care. Fees remain the same. If the back-up is likely to be part of care, some clients wish to meet her prenatally, which can be arranged.

Do we pay more to work with 2 doulas?
No. Fees are outlined in the contract. The cost of working with both doulas is the same as hiring one of them individually.

What kind of postpartum support do you offer?
Your birth doula usually stays for 1-2 hours after the birth, until you’re ready to be on your own with your baby. We also visit in the first day or two postpartum, offering basic breastfeeding support, answering questions, and going over your birth. We are available for questions and can offer resources (educational and community). A second postpartum visit is offered.

What if I need extra help with breastfeeding or baby-care?
The information above describes our work as birth-doulas. Another kind of doula, a “postpartum doula”, specializes in extended care and breastfeeding support. There are also breastfeeding counselors and lactation consultants that can be arranged through public health or hired privately. We can provide resources and contact info. If you’re on the Mother-Baby Unit the nurses or unit Lactation Consultants can provide support.

Where’s that name from?
In ancient Greece “doula” meant the highest female servant who helped the lady of the house through child-bearing. Medical researchers Marshall Klaus and John Kennell, who conducted several randomized clinical trials on the medical outcomes of doula attended births, adopted the term to refer to labour support as well as prenatal and postpartum support.

 

[1] Klaus, M.H.; Kennel, J.H.; Berkowitz, G.; Klaus, P. “Maternal Assistance and Support in Labor: Father, Nurse, Midwife or Doula?” Clinical Consultations in Obstetrics and Gynecology 4 (December 1992).

[2] Sauls, DJ. Effects of labor support on mothers, babies, and birth outcomes. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2002 Nov-Dec; 31(6):733-41.

[3] O’Driscoll, K. and Meagher, D. Active Management of Labor. 2d ed. London: Bailliere Tindall, 1986.

[4] Klaus, M.H. and Kennel, J.H. Parent-Infant Bonding. St. Louis: C.V. Mosby, 1982.