C-19 Updates in our Local Birth & Postpartum Care

Here’s a list of updates for the RGH Labour/Birth Unit and Mother/Baby Units. These are significant. Anything is subject to change. 
 
Some tips for navigating this journey without your extra support people:  
  1. Article: How to Set Up your Birth Room (i.e. What Your Doula Would Normally Do!)
  2. Easing Labour Pain: An online 2-hr class this weekend (Sunday at 1:30) that teaches partners how to provide hands-on birth-support, comfort, and decrease labour pain.
  3. If anyone’s looking for online prenatal classes or virtual hospital tours, check out my site. I teach all the sessions live but online so you can ask questions.

I’ve been keeping in touch with the good people managing the units at RGH. 𝐇𝐞𝐫𝐞’𝐬 𝐚𝗻 𝘂𝗽𝗱𝗮𝘁𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝐑𝐆𝐇 𝐋𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐫/𝐁𝐢𝐫𝐭𝐡 𝐔𝐧𝐢𝐭 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐌𝐨𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐫/𝐁𝐚𝐛𝐲 𝐔𝐧𝐢𝐭𝐬, 𝐝𝐮𝐞 𝐭𝐨 𝐂-𝟏𝟗.
Any of these may change.

Highlights & What’s New

◆ The health region is not on the same timeline as the SK gov’t. Restrictions are still in place at health care facilities. Only ONE support person for the entire process, from admission to discharge. i.e. whoever attends the birth also stays in MBU. No swapping. No visitors.

◆ Labouring women do not need to wear a mask IF they pass screening.

◆ Partners/support persons will be provided with a mask at the entry doors. It can only be removed once they’re in their own birth or mother-baby room. (Bring a big paperclip or string if you want to save sore ears.) Check out these tips for saving your ears from mask-pain.

◆ You’ll see staff wearing masks throughout your stay.

◆ There was a news report that pregnant women in SK will undergo testing for C-19, but that has not trickled down to local practice at this time.

◆ Everyone is screened at the doors; ER screening includes temperature. Staff is aware of allergy season and will screen appropriately.

◆ Bring in only what you would normally bring for your birth. Partner will be given a band so they can go to car later for extras and car-seat. You are still allowed to bring your pillow, clothing etc – whatever you need for comfort.

◆ Nitrous-oxide (“laughing”) gas is available for pain management.

◆ If you or baby are at high-risk for birth complications, you may be asked to use an epidural during labour to avoid the need for a general anaesthetic in case of an urgent/stat caesarean. Best to discuss this with your OB ahead of time so you can learn your options and make a plan.

◆ No one in Regina area is renting birth pools. Midwives are not loaning theirs out. If you have your own then waterbirth at home is still an option.

◆ Food outlets in RGH are open for take-out. You may meet someone at the main doors for food delivery.

◆ Breastfeeding is still being supported at RGH.

◆ There are plans and protocols in place so that mother-baby can stay together if mom is at risk or has symptoms of C-19 in the immediate postpartum.

◆ Even though some community restrictions are being lifted, great care should be taken with newborns once the family is home. Physical distancing and being only with members of the same household are still recommended. Anyone who enters the house can bring in pathogens/bugs.

Other things still happening from previous update:

𝐏𝐫𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐂𝐚𝐫𝐞
● Pregnant women attend appointments, diagnostics (ultrasound, lab) solo. Routine appointments might be done over the phone or spaced out. High-risk and special circumstances will still get the extra care they need.
● Midwifery offices are doing the discussion part of the consult by phone and then a quick in-person appointment for the hands-on part. They prefer pregnant patients attend alone but will allow partners. No other family members/friends/support are allowed.
● Anyone under midwifery or GP care who tests positive for C-19 at any point in their pregnant, birth or postpartum will be immediately transferred to OB care.
● If you’re an early-bird you may be asked to wait in your car until your appointment time.

𝐀𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐧𝐚𝐭𝐚𝐥 𝐂𝐚𝐫𝐞 (𝐋𝐚𝐛𝐨𝐮𝐫, 𝐁𝐢𝐫𝐭𝐡)
The previous section, plus:
● Hospital is locked-down. No visitors except for compassionate visits (no, meeting a cute new babe does not count).
● Everyone entering RGH at ER, main entry and 15th St Admitting door will be screened for C-19 risk factors.
● Doors that don’t have an admitting desk are locked tight; security will not let anyone in. That includes the convenient door just below the MBU.
● Galleys (the kitchenettes) in the units are closed to patients/support person. There is no access to the microwaves, kettles, food, water-ice machines. There is no access to the fridges and freezers, except for the small ones in your room.
● Food Services is limiting snack delivery. Bring your own snacks and food! Maybe a little kettle if you like to make hot drinks. There’s a small fridge in every LBU & MBU room.
● Labouring woman and support person are both screened before entering the LBU. If the support person doesn’t pass screening, they will not be allowed in either unit. An alternate may be invited, who must pass screening and plan to stay for the duration of the admission. If the labouring woman doesn’t pass screening then her and her partner will be put into an isolation room for the birth and postpartum, and not allowed to leave the room for any reason. Food will be delivered by RGH food services.
● Early discharge is being offered as an option for those that are healthy and feel comfortable with newborn care. That means to go home a few hours after your birth instead of staying 24-36 hours.
● Women getting a cervidil induction will be monitored and then sent home to wait for labour to start, as per usual, then rescreened at RGH doors and LBU doors upon return.
● People who show up too early in labour will be sent home, as usual, then rescreened at RGH doors and LBU doors upon return.
● There will be no in-hospital water-birth for midwifery clients. The installed bath-tub is available for comfort in labour.
● Support people are allowed at homebirths but must be screened. If anyone in the home (residents or support people) doesn’t pass screening, then the birth must be transferred to RGH. In that case, the one support person rule applies. Home birthers – screen your people before they come over!
● Screening questions:
1. Have you or anyone in your home been out of the country and returned to Canada prior to March 6th?
2. Have you or anyone in your home been out of the country and returned to Canada March 6th or after?
3. Are you, or someone in your home feeling sick? If yes, what are your symptoms?
4. Have you or anyone in your home been directed to self-isolate? If yes, by who? What date?

𝐏𝐨𝐬𝐭𝐩𝐚𝐫𝐭𝐮𝐦 𝐂𝐚𝐫𝐞
Previous 2 sections, plus:
● Families are being asked to stay in their room as much as possible.
● Partners may not visit any other patient areas.
● Food trays are being provided for new moms in the MBU.
● Breastfeeding class in the unit is still running but only birth mother and baby attend (no partners) and only up to 3 participants.
● Midwives and public health nurses are still providing postpartum home-visits. Some may be done by phone or video, depending on your needs.

Birth Support on a Budget

If rates for full doula care seem too high, please read on.  There are many ways I can contribute to you being prepared and supported through your birth. I offer prenatal classes, birth prep consultations, a lower-priced doula package, birth-plan prep sessions, and creative ideas for paying your doula.  Details for all of this are below.

My current fees of $1200-1600 are a fair reflection of my extensive experience, skills and knowledge.  Besides the often long and unpredictable hours, there are costs associated with being a professional doula. Some of these are monetary such as training, missing other work-shifts, association fees, parking and all the normal expenses related to self-employment.  Other costs are not measurable, such as missed family events, being on-call (700+ hours per client), and recovery time from long births.  Experienced doulas are worth the expense and in fact are the first to fill their client list.

If you wish to benefit from my expertise but the cost is out of your range, then you might be interested in attending prenatal classes or accessing other services such as Birth Plan Preparation, or working with me and one of the doulas I’m mentoring.

  • Easing Labour Pain – a 2hr class (mother and her partner and/or birth companion)
  • Prenatal Classes
  • Placenta Encapsulation
  • Contact me to set up private consultations for specific topics
  • Lower-cost doula package:  Work with me and one of the newer doulas I’m mentoring for $850.  Prenatal preparation is vital for having your ideal birth. Therefore you’ll have all prenatal consultations, including creating a birth-plan and any questions answered along the way, with me and the new doula, who is fully and professionally trained, and meets the requirements of mentorship with me. She’s a professional doula who is building her birth experience. The newer doula will be your primary doula for your labour and birth. We both attend the postpartum visit. (I train Birth and Postpartum Doulas of excellence through Birth Ways International.) Many happy clients have chosen this option.

To understand doula fees, please see http://www.cordmama.com/blog/2015/3/23/why-doulas-are-expensive-and-why-youre-glad-they-are

If you have a partner who doesn’t understand paying for extra support, please see http://goodmenproject.com/families/new-dads-advice-just-hire-a-damn-doula-jrmk/

Other Options:

  • We can set up a payment plan.
  • Gift certificates for my services.
  • Raise funds e.g. a collection-box at your baby-shower or Mother-Blessing, or ask people to contribute to your doula rather than buying other gifts.
  • Find a less experienced doula, as they usually have lower fees. See The Doulas of Regina for a listing of local doulas.
  • If there’s no way you can pay for birth support, check out the Doulas of Regina  Relief Fund.  They pay for doulas to attend the births of women who qualify based on financial need.