Angie The Doula – Postpartum Support and Maternal Mental Health Resources

Postpartum support

At two weeks postpartum, the realities of new parenthood can be a whopper. Many new parents find this time hard, especially during this pandemic when most people don’t have the support they’d normally have. Remember that new normal that most families find around 4-6 weeks? That might feel like forever at this point. 

This is a good time to check in about maternal mental health. Partners can struggle with mental health too. Here are some good resources:

Postpartum Support
  1. Maternal Mental Health Issues This online article includes risk factors (any of these that can be addressed can help make postpartum life easier), things to help, local resources, what partners can do.
    There’s a big range between thriving and needing clinical mental health services. This article has suggestions for things that can help in that space.
  2. Regina Perinatal Health Network is a local organization.
  3. Self assessment tool: This version of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), Edinburg Screening & Care Guide, includes valuable information about risk factors and where to find help. This is the form your health care provider would use if they screened for maternal mental health.
  4. Self assessment tool: The Postpartum Progress Checklist has more questions than the EPDS. It can be used to facilitate discussion between postpartum clients and their health care providers.  

If you’re struggling, then here are some things to consider as next steps:

  • Gather up support. I have a list of postpartum doulas to share in a range of experience and fees. (My list includes several doulas not on the DofR site. I train them and only recommend people I trust. If fee is a barrier or consideration, I can likely help you find someone that fits your budget and needs.)
  • Ask the public-health nurse to come in for a chat.
  • Take your self-assessment tools and/or concerns to your 2-week medical checkup. 
  • Make an appointment with your doctor or midwife.
  • If you have a health plan at work or in-house mental health counsellor, then that will be your fastest route to get counselling and psych services.
  • Call 811 if you need non-emergent medical advice as they are supposed to be well-trained in postpartum mental health.
  • Get medical attention today if you have thoughts of harming self or baby. Unfortunately, that usually means a trip to the ER.
  • In case of psychosis, call 911.

I want to reassure you of two things in case medical help is needed:

  1. Breastfeeding is still possible with almost all mental health drugs. (Many women are reluctant to get help for fear of not being able to BF.)
  2.  Families are kept together during mental illness, as long as there’s one healthy adult (parent, grandparent, relative or close friend as guardian). If a parent has to be admitted to the psych unit then the baby stays with the other parent or guardian. Visits with the mentally ill parent are arranged as soon as possible. A few of my clients have been down this road and it’s not easy but they received excellent care and recovered.   
postpartum support

I teach a variety of Child Birth Education classes and prenatal workshops online for people all over.  I have been a birth doula since 2002, and have helped over 300 clients with their births and over 1000 through prenatal classes. Learn more about my birth doula services, and contact me with any questions you may have.